DIET TO REJUVENATE OUR MENTAL HEALTH  

Diet to rejuvenate our mental health/ image: https://kalpatarurudra.org/jpg
therapist comforting patient
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Undoubtedly, food is our primary need for survival. Food, clothing, and home – all these are our basic demands  for a living. Yes, others are environment and good air also. Air Pollution is a great threat to us. Because our capital, Delhi, is the most  air – polluted city in India. But most important is diet to rejuvenate  our mental health. 

   For survival, food is a major factor. Without food we can not survive. On the other hand, there are some foods which are enemies of our body and mind. So we have to choose good foods and reject bad foods. Eating junk food when you’re depressed can actually make you feel even worse.*

 Our bodies interact with the foods we eat, and the choices we make each day can impact our body’s ability to function at its best. Although there is no specific diet that has been proven to alleviate depression, we can see that there are plenty of nutrient-rich foods that can help to keep our brains healthy.

So we must take foods which can strengthen our body and mind. 

As my whole family members are inclined to be victims of anxiety and depression, I did some substantial research on which foods promote sanity and which ones send an alarm to our limbic system (emotion centre) and cause inflammation. So we decided to eliminate gluten, dairy, caffeine, and sugar from my diet. We also started eating fresh produce throughout my day and committed to hitting the grocery store a few times a week.

As a result, I feel more emotionally resilient and less vulnerable to the impact of stress and drama on my mood.

Here are some of the foods we eat every day to feel good. They provide the nutrients our  bodies  need to fight off inflammation in my brain, which leads to depression.

  •  The foods that help strengthen, and keep the sound  our mental health

Changing your nutrition can be a great addition to traditional therapy, like CBT and medication, but it  comes at a much smaller cost and can be a great way to self-care,” suggested some researcher  at University College London and contributor to the European MOOD – 

FOOD program, which focuses on preventing depression through food.

There are two ways nutritional interventions can help mental health: by increasing healthy habits and reducing unhealthy ones. For the best outcome, we have to do both .

Research has shown the most support for two diets: the Mediterranean diet, which emphasises more healthy fats, and the DASH diet, which focuses on reducing sugar.

First of all, Try Mediterranean Diet:

pastry and boiled egg on plate
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A Spanish research study found that rates of depression tended to rise in men – specially smokers – as they got less folate. The same thing happened for women – especially those who smoked or didn’t exercise – but when they got less Vitamin B12. 

Here, researchers are not sure which way the influence goes: do poor nutrient levels lead to depression, or does depression lead people to eat poorly. In either case, you can get both of these Vitamin B from foods in a Mediterranean diet. 

Get our starch fix with whole grains and legumes.

Fill up on plenty of fruits and veggies.

Focus on eating fatty fish, like salmon or albacore tuna, in place of red meat.

Add in healthy fats, like raw nuts and olive oil.

Enjoy sweets  in moderation.

The Mediterranean diet is more about what you’re adding in — fresh fruits and vegetables, protein-rich legumes, and fatty fish and olive oil (high in omega-3s).

  • Take Omega- 3 Fatty Acids

Scientists noticed that people who don’t eat enough Omega 3s may have higher rates of major depressive disorder. On the other hand, a study shows that people who don’t often eat fish, a rich source of these fatty acids, are more likely to have depression. 

Good sources of Omega – 3, including alpha linolenic acid, are Fatty Fish, Soybean Oil, Nuts, specially Walnuts, Dark Green Leafy Vegetables. 

One study looked at 166 people who were clinically depressed, some being treated with medication. The researchers found that after 12 weeks of eating a modified Mediterranean diet, the participants’ symptoms were significantly better.

An earlier study from 2011, found that when medical students increased their omega-3 fatty acid intake, their anxiety reduced by 20 percent (though with no changes to depression), while in 2016, Spanish researchers found people who followed the Mediterranean lifestyle closest were 50 percent less likely to develop depression than those who didn’t follow the diet as well.

THE MERITS OF DASH DIET :

Embrace whole grains, vegetables, and fruit.

Get protein from chicken, fish, and nuts.

Switch to low-fat or nonfat dairy.

Limit sweets, sugary drinks, saturated fats, and alcohol.

Alternatively, the DASH diet is about what you’re taking out, namely sugar.

A 2017 study that researchers led analysed the sugar intake of over 23,000 people. They found that men who ate the most sugar — 67 or more grams a day, which is 17 teaspoons of sugar (or just under two cans of Coke) — were 23 per cent more likely to develop depression or anxiety over five years compared to those in the bottom third who logged less than 40 grams a day (10 teaspoons).

A new research from Rush University Medical Centre (which will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting) reports that among older adults, those who followed the DASH diet closely were less likely to develop depression over six-and-a-half years compared to those who followed a Western diet.

Going sugar-free to fight depression and anxiety

Simply removing sugar has been life-changing for us. Therefore, we don’t take any sugar in tea. Here sweets are famous and people used to have them. But we take it moderately. We noticed that our anxiety is less than before when we used to take sugar and sweets. 

But during our deep anxiety and depression, we have a tendency to consume more sugar and sweets. I asked my wife, “how do you feel now?” 

She said,  “My moods would be up and down — mostly down. I had feelings of not being good enough, and some days I wanted to die. Then there was the anxiety to the point I couldn’t leave my house without becoming violently ill. P

It wasn’t until she realised how much it was affecting our family and that she wanted to get better for her kids that she started looking at alternative therapies. We started doing yoga and some breathing practice. 

Finally, I found the book “I Quit Sugar.” Then and then, I collected the book  from the book store. 

At the time, we were  eating packets of fried biscuits and cookies with tea in the morning and even in the afternoon and craving dessert before we even ate dinner.

  However, we had  to change our habit when my wife was diagnosed with the gallbladder. After a successful operation, we have changed our food habits. We take the advice of a nutritionist. She gives us a chart of a new menu schedule which we are now following seriously. 

Eventually, a new way of eating consisted of lots of greens and salads, healthy fats, protein from meat, switching sweet dressings for olive oil and lemon juice, and limiting fruits to those with low fructose like blueberries and raspberries.

To me, giving up sweets wasn’t easy. In that first month of coming off sugar, I had to suffer from headaches and constipation.

But at the one-month mark, everything

changed. My energy levels picked up. I was finally sleeping. My moods weren’t

as low. I was happier, and the anxiety and depression just didn’t seem to be there.

Now, two-and-a-half years after going sugar-free, we have been able to win ourselves off our  antidepressants. But It’s not for everyone, but this is what worked for me. I usually went to  my Doctor ( Psychiatrist). She prescribed  me very low doses of medications . 

So if you’re considering stopping your antidepressants, work with your doctor to

create a tapering schedule. You should never stop antidepressant medications on

your own.

OTHER FOODS  AND MENTAL HEALTH: 

Since we don’t have all the answers, biologically, behind anxiety and depression, there’s no clear reason why changing our diet can change our mood.

But we do know a few things: Vitamins in the body help the function of enzymes that enable reactions such as the synthesis of serotonin, which plays an essential role in our happiness.

Meanwhile, too much sugar has been found  to decrease a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is involved in the development of depression and anxiety.

There’s also emerging research  that suggests that our gut plays an important role in mental health.

The microorganisms in our gut can communicate with the brain and several systems that could play a role in depression and anxiety, and the composition. 

When we treat depression with medication, the actual ‘magical’ chemical ingredients matter maybe 15 per cent. It’s the process of working with a doctor and finding the motivation to recognise the problem and take steps towards fixing it that counts for most of the good.

We can get that much of the good in a non-medication intervention that includes diet, exercise, and talking to someone. 

It’s really when you start taking care of yourself — which taking control of your diet certainly counts as — you get remobilization. Your spirits pick up and that’s an antidepressant.

   Diet is a great way of active self-care and self-love — a key in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Nutritionists sometime prescribe it to treat anxiety and depression. I believe seeing oneself as worthy of self-care and therefore worthy of being fed with nutritious food is a great step.

Why certain foods are mood-boosting?

Some enzymes found in food boost serotonin levels.

Sugar is associated  with depression and anxiety.

Emerging science  shows gut health plays a role in anxiety.

So, Eating healthy foods is a great way to practice self-care, important in CBT.

Taking active steps to eat a nutritious diet can increase motivation.

WHICH FOODS WE SHOULD TAKE? 

  1. SMART CARBOHYDRATES : 

There is a link between carbohydrates and the mood-boosting brain chemical, serotonin. Scientists are not sure, but carb cravings sometimes may be related to low serotonin  activity. 

We should wisely choose carbs. Limit sugary foods and opt for smart carbs, such as whole grains, rather than simple carbs, such as cakes and cookies. Besides, fruits, vegetables, and legumes also have healthy carbs and fibres. 

  1. KEEP SELENIUM  – RICH FOODS  IN  DIET :

       Moreover,  Some scientists have suggested that increasing selenium intake might help improve mood and reduce anxiety, which may help make depression more manageable.

Selenium is present in a variety of foods, including:

whole grains

Brazil nuts

some seafood

organ meats, such as liver

Supplements are available for purchase in health food shops.

  1. PROTEIN – RICH FOODS CAN BOOST YOUR ENERGY LEVELS: 
  1. FOODS RICH IN ANTIOXIDANTS: 
  1. HAVE A LITTLE DARK CHOCOLATE 
delicious chocolate bar with nuts
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  1. VITAMIN B- 12 AND B -9 :  

Vitamins B-12 and B-9 (folate, or folic acid) help and maintain the nervous system, including the brain. So, they may help reduce the risk and symptoms of mood disorders, such as depression.

Sources of vitamin B-12 include:

eggs

meat

poultry

fish

oysters

milk

some fortified cereals

Foods that contain folate including :

dark leafy vegetables

fruit and fruit juices

nuts

beans

whole grains

dairy products

meat and poultry

seafood

eggs

People can purchase vitamin B-12 and folate supplements in health food stores.

  1. KEEP ZINC IN YOUR DIET : 

Zinc helps the body perceive taste, but it also boosts the immune system and may influence depression.

Some studies have suggested that zinc levels may be lower in people with depression and that zinc supplementation may help antidepressants work more effectively.

Zinc is present in:

whole grains

oysters

beef, chicken, and pork

beans

nuts and pumpkin seeds etc.

Try something new: Diet to rejuvenate our mental health

Add to your plate some new foods that have been linked to better brain health. This list is based on suggestions from Naidoo and Ramsey.

Leafy greens:

Leafy greens are the foundation of a brain health diet because they are cheap and versatile and have a high ratio of nutrients to calories.

• Colourful fruits and vegetables: The more colourful your plate, the better the food is for your brain.

• Seafood: Sardines, oysters, mussels, wild salmon and cod are sources of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids that are essential for brain health. If you don’t eat fish, chia seeds, flax seeds and sea vegetables are also good sources of omega-3s.

Nuts, beans and seeds:

Try to eat between a half cup and a full cup of beans, nuts and seeds a day, Ramsey said. Nuts and seeds, including cashews, almonds, walnuts and pumpkin seeds, are a great snack, but they can also be added to stir-fry dishes and salads. Black and red beans, lentils and legumes can also be added to soups, salads and stews or enjoyed as a side dish.

assorted vegetable lot
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• Spices and herbs: Cooking with spices not only makes your food taste better, but studies suggest certain spices may lead to a better balance of gut microbes, reduce inflammation and even improve memory. Naidoo especially likes turmeric; studies suggest that its active ingredient, curcumin, may have benefits for attention and overall cognition. “Turmeric can be very powerful over time,” she said.

• Fermented foods: Fermented foods are made by combining milk, vegetables or other raw ingredients with microorganisms such as yeast and bacteria. A recent study found that six servings a day of fermented foods can lower inflammation and improve the diversity of your gut microbiome. Fermented foods include yoghurt, kombucha and kimchi.

• Dark chocolate: People who regularly eat dark chocolate have a 70 per cent reduced risk of depression symptoms, according to a large government survey of nearly 14,000 adults.

In addition, Supplements are also available in health food stores and pharmacies.

Learn more about the health benefits of zinc here.

    So,  •   eat at set intervals throughout the day.

  • Dark Chocolate
  • Choose less refined sugars and eat more whole grains
  • Include protein at each meal
  • Eat a variety of foods
  • Include omega-3 rich foods, like oily fish, in your diet
  • Reach and maintain a healthy weight
  • Drink plenty of fluids, especially water
  • Get regular exercise 
  • Eat your Fruit whole 

Dark Chocolate has chemicals called flavonoids that can make more blood flow to your brain and may help you think more clearly. But don’t overdo it. Because Chocolate also has fat and calories and lots of caffeine, too. Just a small square of the dark stuff — 70% cocoa or more — 2 or 3 times a week may be all you need.

AVOID PROCESSED FOODS:

If you eat lots of processed meat, fried food, refined cereals, candy, pastries, and high-fat dairy products, you’re more likely to be anxious and depressed. Therefore, a diet full of whole fibre-rich grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish can help keep you on a more even keel.

DOUGHNUTS: 

We all love them, and little treats now and then can help your mood. But just so you know: Doughnuts have all the wrong kinds of fats, snow-white flour with little fibre to slow absorption, and lots of added sugar. So, if you must, make them a treat, not a routine.

‘LIGHT’ DRESSING: 

  You should avoid some pre-packaged dressings and marinades loaded with sugar, often listed as high-fructose corn syrup. But what about light or sugar-free dressings? Some used to have their sweetness from aspartame, an artificial sweetener linked to anxiety and depression. So, check the ingredients, or it is better to make your dressing at home from scratch. 

AVOID SKIPPING MEALS: DIET TO REJUVENATE OUR MENTAL HEALTH

 Missing a meal, especially breakfast, can lead to low blood sugar. This will likely leave you feeling weak and exhausted.

CUTTING OUT ENTIRE FOOD GROUP: 

If you reduce the variety of foods in your diet, it can be more difficult to get all the essential nutrients you need. Low levels of zinc, iron, B vitamins, magnesium, vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids are associated with worsening mood and decreased energy.

AVOID EATING TOO MUCH REFINED CARBOHYDRATES: 

  Moreover, high intakes of unhealthy, processed carbohydrates, such as white bread and pastries, cause blood sugars to rise and fall rapidly. And ultimately this can lead to low energy and irritability.

  TRY TO AVOID ENERGY DRINK & ALCOHOL 

   ,

Read more: Anxiety & Depression In Adolescent Girls

Why Do We Get Angry? And How to Control It ?

Why Do We Get  Angry? And How to Control It? Dr Sushil Rudra 19.01.2022 Why Do We Get Angry? And How to Control It? image: pixel/ https://kalpatarurudra.org/jpg

Life is full of emotion. We laugh in joy, we cry in pain and suffering, we become angry when we feel insulted and lose anything. We have to feel so due to our emotions. So angry is natural. Everyone has experienced anger. It’s normal and healthy to feel angry from time to time in response to certain situations. But why do we get angry and how to control it, is explained here in this post. 

Table Of Contents:

•  Intro : Why do We get Angry? And How to Control It?

When Do We Get Angry? Or Lose Our Temper?

What Are The Causes Of Losing Temper?

  • Is Genetic Responsible for The Anger?

• Sign and Symptoms Of Anger :

• Depression And Anger :  

•Anger And The Brain:

• Physical Effects Of Anger :

•How To Control An Angry Mind? :  

• Depression And Anger :

•You Can Change Your Anger Into A Positive Lifestyle :

• When Anger Is Harmful?  :

How To Tell Your Child To Control Anger :

• The Bottom Line:

• INTRO: WHY DO WE GET ANGRY?

From time immortal anger has been a lifestyle of human beings. We know that in ancient times the Rishis and monks cursed in anger when they were being insulted. We know about Rishi ( Monk) Vishwamitra who used to curse being angered. So every human being is to face this kind of disrupting emotions. 

When Do We Lose Our Temper? 

Many things can trigger anger. It includes stress, family problems, personal success problems, financial issues, missing goals of any project, being insulted, and so on. For some people, an underlying disorder is responsible for anger, such as depression, stress or mood swings, or alcoholism.

So anger itself is not considered a disorder, but anger is a known symptom of several mental health conditions. 

What Are The Causes of Losing Temper? 

Anger comes from mental distress. Previously I have said that anger comes from different personal and social causes. Even mental health is responsible for it. Some of these are deep underlying unresolved conflicts that have not been addressed, whereas other reasons include the following: 

  • Feeling Hopeless  • Feeling Powerless • Being Disrespected  • Being Jealousy • Being Physically harmed •  Feeling Threatened or Violated  • Being Disrespected or Treated Unfairly

  •   Being Over Stressed or Massive Anxiety. • Being treated Unfairly, • Being Dissatisfied in Career or Job, • Not being Achieved Good Results, • Being not Satisfied in Conjugal Life and a lot of reasons actively play a role behind this negative emotional state. Though it also plays a positive impact on our lives. I will discuss it later. 

 Mainly, personal problems give birth to anger, such as unemployment, missing a promotion at work, relationship difficulties, being not successful in any work, memories of a traumatic or enraging event, not fulfilling any plan or work etc. 

According to Kathryn Moore, an eminent psychologist, anger may come from different situations and it may vary from person to person. Moore said that there are some common causes of pent up anger, such as feeling unheard or unappreciated, lack of acceptance of a situation, or unmet needs. 

Is Genetic Responsible for Trigger Anger? 

The answer is “Yes”. I have seen in my family that my elder brothers occasionally became angry and got fired up in anger. When I returned home during the evening playing in the field and late to start my regular lessons, they became highly angry.

Now I understand that they have gotten it from my maternal grandfather. I have heard from my mother that her father was a very serious and angry person. 

Therefore, genetics and our bodies ability to deal with certain chemicals and hormones also play a role in how we deal with anger. If your brain does not react normally to serotonin, you might find it more difficult to manage your emotions. 

  But sometimes people experience uncontrollable anger that often escalates when the provocation is not sufficient. Under these circumstances, anger is not a normal problem. 

Sign and Symptoms of Anger :

Irritability, Internal restlessness, Sadness, Frustration, shouting and yelling,

Swearing, name-calling, and making threats,A physical expression such as hitting people, animals, or objects, Becoming withdrawn and distant Inflicting, self-harm etc.  

The Role Of  The Brain In Provoking Anger : 

 The cortex is the working part of our brain where logic and judgement reside. The cortex can be described as the strategy and control centre of the brain. The limbic centre is the emotional centre of our brain and is known as the more primitive part of our brain.

Within the limbic system is a small structure called the amygdala, a storehouse for emotional memories, which is also the area of the brain responsible for our “fight or flight” reactions aka our natural survival instincts. When we feel and express anger, we are using the limbic centre of our brain.

When someone is experiencing and expressing anger, they are not using the thinking (cortex) part of the brain, but primarily, the limbic centre of the brain.When we become angry, our “fight or flight” response is triggered, releasing a flood of hormones that cause physical and emotional alarm.

This anger is then carried out to yelling, impatience, frustration, and hurtful words.Identify problems in your past that could contribute to your anger. Were you abused or harshly punished in your past?

Do you have difficulty controlling your temper and your emotions? Do you lack a sense of inner peace? Identify present scenarios that make you angry, such as dissatisfaction at your job, spouse, self, or child. 

How to Manage Your Anger? And it’s Causes:

Suppose you are dealing with a stressful situation or are experiencing bullying or negative life circumstances. In that case, it is normal to experience anger and frustration, especially when dealing with chronic feelings of stress, isolation, and anxiety.

As a child or a young adult, you may have been raised around unhealthy and nonproductive ways to experience anger. Maybe your parents, caretakers, or elderly family members did not express their emotions in a healthy manner, which overflowed and carried into adulthood.

Recognising that you did not learn healthy ways to manage your anger in childhood is the first step to understanding why your anger boils over into unhealthy emotions and circumstances in adulthood.

If you have experienced past traumatic events, it can be normal to feel residual anger as traumatic events can have a lasting effect on your psyche.A licensed therapist or mental health counsellor can help you work through your past trauma, present stressful situations, and underlying childhood conflicts in hopes of offering you guidance and healing. 

Why Do We Get Angry?

You will get many helplines and

the Best Online Therapy Program

.

Anger and Acting out: Why do we get angry?

Anger is an emotion that does not always have to be acted upon. For example, we can become angry but not express our anger outwardly. Acting out our aggression often goes hand in hand with anger; however, not everyone angry will be aggressive, and not every aggressive behaviour is fuelled by anger. 

Can Anger Be a Positive Emotion?

Our society views anger as a negative emotion. Therefore, we often do not want to address it or feel guilty addressing it, but can anger become a healthy outlet when addressed appropriately?

Anger becomes harmful when you don’t regard it as a signal to correct the underlying problem. You let the anger fester until you dislike your feelings, yourself, and the person who caused you to feel this way.It bubbles to the surface in the form of aggression. Unaddressed anger can fester and create more significant problems such as depression, anxiety, aggression, and broken relationships.

Read More: Winter Blues: Why You Should Be Cautious about Winter Depression !

Emotions, even anger, serve a purpose.Healthy Anger forces you to fix the problem initially. Because you’re not going to let your behaviour go uncorrected.

Secondly, because you don’t want your anger to turn into aggression, this is helpful anger.Comprehending your anger and addressing the underlying triggers are the first steps to working through your anger and resolving any negative feelings and thoughts associated with the anger.

Anger can potentially be a positive emotion when we use it to solve problems and recognise conflicts. It is important to accept our anger as a normal emotion, and instead of acting on it in negative ways, we learn to express it in healthy manners, so we do not have to carry it around like a heavyweight.

Expressing our anger in healthy manners means that we take time to breathe, work through our emotions, and develop healthy solutions. This may mean writing down our thoughts, setting boundaries and limits before becoming angry, recognising any unresolved conflict or underlying ideas, forming a plan, talking to friends and family about our emotions, and going to therapy. 

Think Before We Act: Why do We get Angry?

Expressing our anger while angry makes us angrier and can make the other person hurt and afraid, so they get angrier, and this does not help anyone.Instead of solving anything, this deepens the rift in the relationship.

Therefore, the answer is always to calm down first. Then consider the more profound “message” of the anger before making decisions about what to say and do.

 5 Ways to Cope With Anger :

Why do We get Angry?

How to Get Help?

You find yourself wondering, “Why am I so angry?” It might be a sign that you need to find some healthy ways to manage this difficult emotion.

Anger is a normal emotion that everyone experiences from time to time. Many situations can trigger feelings of anger, which may range in intensity from mild annoyance to profound range.

It is when anger becomes extreme, uncontrollable, or chronic that it can pose a serious problem. It can lead to stress that harms your health or even affects your relationships with other people. Because of this, it is important to understand what you can do when you are feeling angry to get your feelings under control.

While anger is often connected to negative health consequences, research suggests that the use of constructive ways of managing anger is associated with a lower risk of heart disease.

If you are experiencing anger, there are things that you can do to manage your emotions. Below is a list of some things that may help.          

   1.Some Deep Breaths can ease   your Anger:

 When anger rises , it’s easy to get caught up in the heat of the moment. Your body often enters a state known as the fight-or-flight response, which helps prime your body to take action. Your heart rate increases and you begin to breathe much more rapidly.      

  To take control and reduce feelings of anger, it can be helpful to focus on your breathing. Focus on taking slow, deep, controlled breaths. Rather than taking shallow breaths that only fill your chest, try taking in deeper breaths that expand your belly as well.

     The most important thing about deep breathing is that it is something that you can use quickly at the moment whenever anger threatens to overwhelm you. It can give you time to calm yourself, take some moments to think and respond in a way that isn’t going to have long-term negative effects.          

   2. Comprehend Your Response to Anger: Why do We get Angry?      

  Feelings of anger are usually accompanied by both physical and mental symptoms. You might feel your heart rate and breathing increase. You may feel feelings of frustration, stress, irritation, and rage.

Your anger may also trigger anxiety and feel overwhelming at times, and afterwards, you might be left with feelings of guilt.  

  Moreover, It is important to remember that anger isn’t always expressed in the same way. Outward expressions of anger such as yelling or breaking things may be more apparent, but anger can also be expressed in more inward or passive ways.    

  When you direct your anger inward, you might do things to punish or isolate yourself. You might berate yourself with negative self-talk or even engage in actions that result in self-harm.         

  Passive anger often involves withholding attention or affection to punish others. The silent treatment and sulking are two examples of more passive expressions of anger.       

     3. Try to Change Your Thinking:

One way to reduce your anger is to change the way that you think about events, people, or situations. When you find yourself focusing on things negatively or irrationally, it’s easy to get caught up in emotions that feel dramatic and even overwhelming.

Cognitive reframing is a technique that is often used in some types of therapy to help change the way that people think about the things that happen to them. By changing these thoughts, you may be less likely to experience negative emotions such as anger.     

     4.   Use Relaxation Strategies

: Why do We get Angry?

In addition to deep breathing, learning relaxation strategies such as mindfulness, meditation, visualisation, and progressive muscle relaxation can help you keep your cool when you find yourself getting angry.       

  Mindfulness is a good approach that encourages people to focus on the here and now, including how they are feeling in the present moment.

Learning how to be mindful of how you are feeling can foster a greater sense of self-awareness and often allows you to look at anger-provoking situations in a more detached way. 

Mindfulness-based treatment strategies are an effective approach for reducing feelings of anger and aggression.    

    5.  Try to Understand Why You’re Feeling Angry:  

Why do We get Angry?

 In addition to finding new ways to think and respond, it is also important to understand what might be triggering your anger in the first place. Anger can be caused by several different things.     

   Factors such as your personality, your coping style, your relationships, and your stress levels can all play a part in determining how much anger you experience in response to different situations and triggers.

  • There are some episodes or things that can trigger anger including:

Conflicts in relationships family problems financial problem memories of negative events problems at work situations such as traffic, accidents, cancelled plans or being late some cases, however, anger may be a symptom of an underlying mental health condition.

Some of the conditions that may cause anger to include:

How Alcohol  Effects badly  and Creates disorder: Why do We get Angry?

In Summer, Consuming alcohol can contribute to feelings of anger, particularly if you drink too much at once or if you consume alcohol regularly.

Alcohol can make it difficult to control your emotions, decrease inhibition, and affect your ability to think clearly, all of which may contribute to feelings of anger.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder : Why do We get Angry?

ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder that begins in childhood and is marked by symptoms of hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsivity. A short temper and outbursts of anger are also quite common.

Bipolar disorder: 

Bipolar disorder is marked by dramatic changes in mood. People often experience periods of depression that can be marked by hopelessness, sadness, and irritability.

Besides, they may also experience mania characterised by agitation, euphoria, and impulsivity. Both mood states can produce feelings of anger and Depression:

Depression and symptoms of low mood, irritability, and hopelessness. Such symptoms may also play a part in periods of anger.

Intermittent explosive disorder:  People with this condition experience episode of angry, aggressive behaviour. They often have intense bursts of anger that are out of proportion to the situations and are accompanied by arguments, tantrums, and even violence.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder :    

 OCD is characterised by the presence of unwanted obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours. Research also suggests that many people with the condition also experience feelings of frustration and anger.

Oppositional defiant disorder :

 Children with this condition are often irritable, short-tempered, and angry. They frequently display defiance, argue with parents and others, and may have outbursts of anger and aggression.

When and How to Get Help? 

While everyone feels angry sometimes, it is important to remember that it can sometimes be a sign of an underlying mental health condition.

If your anger is chronic, troubling, or causing problems in your ability to function normally, talk to your doctor. Your doctor may evaluate you to see what other symptoms you might be experiencing.

This might involve answering questions or filling out a questionnaire to screen for certain mental disorders. Your doctor may also conduct a physical or perform lab tests to rule out any medical conditions that might be playing a role in your symptoms.

Your doctor may then recommend treatments such as psychotherapy, medications, or a combination of the two.

You Can Change Your Anger Into Positive Lifestyle: When Anger Turns into Positive Outlook!

Anger can often be a normal response to a difficult situation. When managed effectively, anger can even serve as a positive force, motivating you to make changes that will resolve the problem.

But it is important to understand when anger is excessive, chronic, or harmful. Finding things to do when you are angry can help you reduce the harm that these emotions can sometimes cause—and inspire you to seek help if you think your anger might be a sign of something more serious.

How to Control Anger in healthy ways: 

Some powerful Suggestions on how to express your anger in healthy ways include:If you feel out of control, walk away from the situation temporarily until you cool down.

Recognise and accept the emotion as normal and part of life. Try to pinpoint the exact reasons why you feel angry.

Once you have identified the problem, consider coming up with different strategies for how to remedy the situation.

Do something physical, such as going for a run or playing sports. Talk to someone you trust about how you’re feeling.

When Anger Is Harmful? 

When one deal with people unhelpful and unhealthy ways and express their anger in inappropriate and harmful ways, including Suddenly anger explodes, it’s very dangerous.

Some people have very little control over their anger and tend to explode in rages. It is very harmful for the person.

You know that Rage anger may lead to physical abuse or violence. Therefore,  a man or woman who doesn’t control their temper can isolate themselves from family and friends. 

Some people turn into rages, have low self-esteem, and use their anger as a way to manipulate others and feel powerful. 

On the other hand, some people consider that anger is an inappropriate or ‘bad’ emotion and choose to suppress it.       

   However, bottled anger often turns into depression and anxiety. Some people vent their bottled anger at innocent parties, such as children or pets. 

  •   You Should Deal with arguments: 

When you have argued, it is easy to stay angry or upset with the other person. If you don’t resolve an argument with a person you see often, it can be a very uncomfortable experience.

Talking to the person about your disagreement may or may not help. If you do approach them, make sure it is helpful.

Stay calm and communicate openly and honestly.If the person could be violent or abusive, it may be best not to approach them directly.

You could talk to them over the phone to see if they are open to finding a solution to the argument if you feel safe to do so.

It might be helpful to ask someone to be there with you, to give you support when you make the call and afterwards.You talk to them casually.

Try to tell them   how you feel as a result of their opinion, but avoid trying to tell them how they feel. It is possible to agree to disagree.

You may need someone else to help you resolve the disagreement. You could ask a trusted third person to act as a go-between and help you both get another view on the argument.

 Reasons for dealing with arguments: There are good reasons for dealing with arguments, including:

It will give you a sense of achievement and make you feel more positive. You may feel more relaxed, healthier and more able to get a good night’s sleep. Moreover, you may develop stronger relationships and you may feel happier.

Finally, Here are a few suggestions for long-term anger management: 

The way you typically express anger may take some time to modify. These are the  Suggestions to manage your anger :

• Keep a diary of your anger outbursts, to try and understand how and why you get mad. Consider assertiveness training, or learning about techniques of conflict resolution.

• Learn relaxation techniques, such as meditation or yoga. See a counsellor or psychologist if you still feel angry about events that occurred in your past.Exercise regularly.

• Benefits of regular exercise in mood management:

When People  are stressed, they  are more likely to experience anger. However, numerous worldwide studies have documented that regular exercise can improve mood and reduce stress levels.

This may be because physical exertion burns up stress chemicals, and it also boosts the production of mood-regulating neurotransmitters in the brain, including endorphins and catecholamines.

• How to Teach Your Kids about Anger? 

Teach your children how to express anger. Expressing anger appropriately is a learned behaviour and a good skill. Suggestions on helping your child to deal with strong feelings include:

 Let them know that anger is natural and should be expressed appropriately.So, treat your child’s feelings with respect.Teach practical problem-solving skills.

• Encourage open and honest communication in the home.Allow them to express their anger in inappropriate ways.

• Explain the difference between aggression and anger.Have consequences for aggression or violence, but not appropriately expressed anger.

Thereore, teach your child different ways of calming and soothing themselves.

THE  BOTTOM LIN : AGAIN SOME ADVICE! 

  1. You Should  Think before you speak:

(Why do we get angry?l

When you are angry, in the heat of the moment, it’s easy to say something you’ll later regret. So, take a few moments to collect your thoughts before saying anything — and allow others involved in the situation to do the same.    

2. Once you’re calm and normal, express your anger:

(Why do we get angry?)

As soon as you’re thinking clearly, express your frustration in an assertive but non-confrontational way. State your concerns and needs clearly and directly, without hurting others or trying to control them. 

  3. A Few exercises Can Control Anger :

Physical activity can help reduce the stress that can cause you to become angry. So, If you feel your anger escalating, go for a brisk walk or run, or spend some time doing other enjoyable physical activities. 

   4. Take a Short Break and Give a Space Only For You :

(Why do we get angry?)

   Give yourself short breaks during times of the day that tend to be stressful. A few moments of quiet time might help you feel better prepared to handle what’s ahead without getting irritated or angry.   

 5. Try to Accommodate  to  Identify possible solutions:

Instead of focusing on what made you angry, work on resolving the issue at hand. Do your children not study seriously which drives  you crazy?

Be serious about your evening prayers. 

Is your partner late for dinner every night? Schedule meals later in the evening — or agree to eat on your own a few times a week.

Remind yourself that anger won’t fix anything and might only make it worse. 

   6. Stick with ‘I’ statements to avoid criticising or placing blame — which might only increase tension — use “I” statements to describe the problem. Be respectful and specific.

For example, say, “I’m upset that you left the table without offering to help with the dishes” instead of “You never do any housework.”   

  7. Don’t Shelter Your grudges. Be Compassionate :

Forgiveness is a powerful tool. If you allow anger and other negative feelings to crowd out positive feelings, you might find yourself swallowed up by your bitterness or sense of injustice.

But if you can forgive someone who angered you, you might both learn from the situation and strengthen your relationship.    

   8.  Humour Talks Or Gesture Can  Release Your Tension:

Lightening up can help diffuse tension. Use humour to help you face what’s making you angry and, possibly, any unrealistic expectations you have for how things should go. Avoid sarcasm, though — it can hurt feelings and make things worse.    

 9. Do Practice Some Skills Of Relaxation:

When your temper flares, put relaxation skills to work. Practice deep-breathing exercises, imagine a relaxing scene, or repeat a calming word or phrase, such as “Take it easy.”

You might also listen to music, write in a journal or do a few yoga poses — whatever it takes to encourage relaxation.     

  10. Know when to seek help :

Learning to control anger is a challenge for everyone at times. Seek help for anger issues if your anger seems out of control, causes you to do things you regret or hurts those around you.   

   11. Practice Yoga and Breathing Exercises

: (Why do we get angry?)

Shut your eyes and follow your breathing deeply. Try it for only 5 to 10 minutes. You will get results immediately. It will diminish your anger and rage with in few minutes.     

  12. Meditation is a great way to control anger.

Dr Sushil Rudra 19.01.2022 

  

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Winter Blues: Why You Should Be Cautious about Winter Depression !

Winter Blues: Why You Should Be Cautious about Winter Depression/ image:https://kalpatarurudra.org/jpg

We generally welcome winter to enjoy for Choruibhati( feast with friends outside)  to spend some time roaming one shop to another in the Fair or travelling anywhere with friends and family near or far. Winter comes here after Autumn with a calming atmosphere. Naturally, it’s the best time to enjoy. Generally, winter exists only for two months in the plain lands – December and January. Sometimes it continues up to February. However, Summer and Rainy seasons are not good for any social or individual entertainment. Most ceremonies start from this Winter season, such as wedding ceremonies, fairs like Gangasagar Mela(Religious Fair) , Kumbh Mela ( Religious Fair ) , film festivals, book fairs etc. But this season has some adverse effects on the body and mind. Winter Blues or Winter depression is one of the fatal effects which we have to face in this season. But What’s winter Blues and why you should be cautious about Winter depression? – this is our discussion all about it. 

WINTER SEASON & WINTER BLUES: WHY YOU SHOULD BE CAUTIOUS?


The bitter cold and the rapidly wrapping up of dark evening – lessen the excitement and the pleasant state of mind. Sometimes it deeply affects mental health which turns out into mental depressions. This is Winter Blues in medical terms. Mainly aged people are affected by this short term depression. 

Winter Blues or Winter depression starts at the beginning of the Winter season. And it continues throughout the season. As a result, we named it Winter Blues or Seasonal Affective Disorder( SAD). It decreases at the beginning of Spring and summer. The affected people gradually become healthy. They get to feel happiness and zeal during the warm and bright light of the Sun.  

AFFECTED PEOPLE WITH WINTER BLUES? :

SAD affects about 4 to 9 per cent of people. Women are a greater number affected by this disease than men. About 6 to 9 per cent of Americans are to face this kind of stuff health issue. 

Being wrapped up in Winter Blues in Winter, your symptoms start in the fall and continue into the winter months, sapping your energy and making you feel moody. These symptoms often resolve during the Spring and Summer. 

Less often, SAD causes depression in the Spring or early Summer, and resolve during the fall of Winters. In most cases, seasonal affective disorder symptoms late fall or early winter and go away during the Sunnier days of Spring and Summer. 

      These symptoms may start mild and become more severe as the season progresses.

Now questions, What Are The Causes Behind this Winter Blues or Depression? Why You Should be Cautious about Winter Depression?

In a nutshell, the causes of Winter Blues are as follows:

  1. Your Biological Clock( circadian rhythm) 
  2. Serotonin Levels – A drop in serotonin brain chemical( neurotransmitter) that affects mood. 
  3. Melatonin Levels – The change in season can disrupt the balance of the body’s level of melatonin, which plays a role in sleep patterns and mood. 
  4. Family History
  5. Having major depression or bipolar disorder
  6. Living far from the Equator 
  7. Low Level of Vitamin D 

The mental disorder in Winter happens due to a “phase-shift” of the circadian rhythm. The wall clock may tell you it’s time to get up, but your body’s internal clock says that you should be resting more. Bright light in the morning resets your circadian clock. 

Winter Blues or Seasonal Affective Disorder is diagnosed more often in women than men. And it occurs more frequently in younger adults than in older adults. 

Which Complications The Winter Blues Or SAP Patients Face? 

Mainly the Complications are : 

  1. Social Withdrawal
  2. School or official work problems
  3. Substance Abuse
  4. Anxiety 
  5. Eating and Sleeping problem
  6. Suicidal Thoughts

Here Is In Details: 

Patients suffering from recurrent depression with a seasonal pattern have insufficient levels of Vitamin D and research investigating this association suggests that daily intake of 10000 IU of Vitamin D may improve the depressive symptoms and general health. 

      The Vitamin D Council recommends that healthy adults can take 2000 IU of Vitamin D daily – even more, if they get little or no sun exposure. There is evidence that people with a lot of body fat need more Vitamin D than lean people. 

     Some Scientists think that certain hormones made deep in the brain trigger attitude-related changes at certain times of the year. Experts believe that SAD may be related to these hormonal changes. 

ANOTHER THEORY: WINTER BLUES: WHY YOU SHOULD BE CAUTIOUS ?


    One theory is that less sunlight during fall and winter leads to the brain making less serotonin, a chemical linked to the brain pathways that regulate moods. When nerve cell pathways in the brain that regulate mood don’t work the way they should, the result can be feelings  of depression along with symptoms of fatigue and weight gain. 

     People with Winter Blues typically sleep much more than usual and crave carbohydrates. Mainly they have some signs of depression, including: 

  • Fatigue • Less Energy • Feeling sad and hopeless. • Trouble Concentrating •  Irritating  mood  • Too much appetite  •  Desire to be alone. •  Weight Gain •    Thoughts of Suicide etc. 

 WHAT SHOULD BE DONE? WINTER BLUES: WHY YOU SHOULD BE CAUTIOUS?

    People with Winter Blues should go outside in the morning to get more natural light. If this is impossible because of the cold weather, antidepressant medication may help. 

REGULAR DIET CAN REDUCE YOUR DOWN MIND :

 Have you serious in your regular diet?  If you not, you have to suffer a lot. A well-balanced diet can improve your energy levels. So get a well-balanced diet. This will help you to have more energy, even you are craving starchy and sweet foods. 

   Besides, Yoga and exercise can enhance your energy levels. Exercising  for 30 minutes a day, five times a week can be helpful to overcome Winter Blues. 

  Be social. Stay involved with your social circle and regular activities. An active mind is always  far from the mental illness. So engage, engage and engage in works.

 • WINTER BLUES: WHY YOU SHOULD BE CAUTIOUS?

WHEN SAD OR WINTER BLUES IS REPORTED AND NAMED? 

   In the early 1980s, Norman E. Rosenthal, M.D., and his associates at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) systematically first reported and named this mental illness as Winter Blues.

Rosenthal initially being motivated by his desire to discover the cause of his own experience of depression during the dark days of the northern US winter tried to make a decision. He thought, polar night is the cause behind it.

He theorized that the reduction in available natural light during winter was the cause. Rosenthal and his colleagues then documented the phenomenon of SAD in a placebo-controlled study utilising light therapy.

A paper based on this research was published in 1984. Although Rosenthal’s ideas were initially greeted with scepticism, SAD has become well recognised, and his 1993 book, Winter Blues has become the standard introduction to the subject.

Research on Winter Blues began in 1979 when Herb Kern, a research engineer, had noticed that he felt depressed during the winter months. Kern suspected that scarcer light in winter was the cause and discussed the idea with scientists at the NIMH who were working on bodily rhythms.

Finally, They were devising a lightbox to treat Kern’s depression. Kern felt much better within a few days of treatment. Therefore, they treated other patients in the same way.

SIGN AND SYMPTOMS IN DETAIL: WINTER BLUES: WHY YOU SHOULD BE CAUTIOUS?

Winter Blues is a type of major depressive disorder. And sufferers may exhibit any of the associated symptoms, such as :

Feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness, thoughts of suicide, loss of interest in activities, withdrawal from social interaction, sleep and appetite problems, difficulty with concentrating and making decisions, decreased libido, a lack of energy, or agitation.

•     Symptoms of Winter Blues often include 1. Falling asleep earlier or in less than 5 minutes in the evening, 2. Oversleeping or difficulty waking up in the morning, 4. Nausea, and 5. A tendency to overeat, often with a craving for carbohydrates, which leads to weight gain. 

Winter Blues ( Why You Should be Cautious about Winter Depression?) is typically associated with winter depression, but springtime lethargy or other seasonal mood patterns are not uncommon. Although each case is different, in contrast to winter SAD.

People who experience spring and summer depression may be more likely to show symptoms such as insomnia, decreased appetite and weight loss, and agitation or anxiety.

The symptoms of it mimic those of dysthymia or even major depressive disorder. There is also the potential risk of suicide in some patients experiencing Winter Blues .

 One study reports 6–35% of sufferers required hospitalisation during one period of illness.  At times, patients may not feel depressed, but rather lack the energy to perform everyday activities.

Sub syndrome Seasonal Affective Disorder is a milder form of SAD. U.S Population, estimated 14.3% (vs. 6.1% SAD) of experience it every year.  The blue feeling experienced by both SAD and SUB-SAD sufferers can usually get free by exercise and increased outdoor activities. Particularly if they go out on sunny days and have a bath of sun rays or solar exposure, they return to normal lives.

It is sure that connections between human mood, as well as energy levels, and the seasons are well documented, even in healthy individuals.

According to some Psychiatrists DSM-IV criteria, Seasonal Affective Disorder is not a separate disorder. They think it as a “course specifier”. Therefore, it may be applied as an added description to the pattern of major depressive episodes in patients with major depressive disorder or patients with bipolar disorder.

The “Seasonal Pattern Specifier” must meet four criteria: 1. depressive episodes at a particular time of the year; 2. remissions or mania/hypo-mania at a characteristic time of year; 3. these patterns must have lasted two years with no nonseasonal major depressive episodes during that same period, and 4. these seasonal depressive episodes outnumber other depressive episodes throughout the patient’s lifetime.

USE OF LIGHT THERAPY:  Winter Blues: Why you should be Cautious about winter depression?  

There is evidence that many patients with SAD have a delay in their circadian rhythm, and that bright light treatment corrects these delays which may be responsible for the improvement in patients.

 

Management:  Occupational therapy in the management of Winter Blues: Why You Should Be Cautious?

Treatments for classic (winter-based) seasonal Winter Blues or affective disorder include light therapy, medication, ionising-air administration,cognitive-behavioural therapy and carefully timed supplementation of the hormone melatonin.

Read more: 1. Anxiety & Depression In Adolescent Girls. 2. Depression and Insurgency In Kashmir

Like many other mood disorders, you can take action to lessen the severity of the symptoms associated with  the winter blues.

While you may not be able to change the weather or amount of daylight during the winter, you can practice good self-care to help you feel better. 

  • Here are 10 strategies you can try to defeat the winter blues. 
  • Let Take a Break From the News: Winter Blues: Why You Should Be Cautious about Winter Depression?

Being indoors more often means an increase in screen time. And if this time is spent consuming a non-stop news cycle, you may feel an increase in the winter blues.

To help minimise stress, sadness, and despair from the news, try to limit the amount of time you spend in front of a screen. If possible, schedule one hour for news. You can watch this in one sitting or break it up into chunks.

  • Proper Diet Can Boost Your Mood :

A simple change to boost your mood is to consider the food you eat. Consuming protein with breakfast, lunch, and dinner can enhance mood and prevent sugar and carb cravings later in the day.

Besides,  foods that are high in vitamin D such as fatty fish, fish oil, and vitamin D fortified foods like milk, orange juice, breakfast cereal, yogurt, and other food sources can help balance mood.

According to one meta-analysis, researchers found that people with depression have low vitamin D levels, and people with low vitamin D are at a greater risk of depression. 

If you are not getting enough vitamin D in your diet or through sunlight, talk to your doctor about taking a supplement, especially in the winter months.

  • Fix  Up Your Sleep Routine: 

Sleep is a huge component of mood. Without adequate, regular sleep, psychologist Kelly Donahue, PhD, says our circadian rhythm can get disrupted, which also disrupts cortisol rhythms and impacts hormone production. To improve your sleep, Donahue recommends:

Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day.

Follow a simple bedtime routine that signals rest, such as taking a bath, turning down the lights, or drinking a cup of herbal tea.

Expose yourself to light as soon as you wake up.

Sleep in a cool, dark room.

Don’t use electronics in your bedroom.

Write all of your worry thoughts on a piece of paper before bed so that if you wake up in the night, you can tell your mind you don’t need to worry because the thoughts are captured on paper and will be waiting for you to tackle in the morning.

  •  Some Physical Activity Can Do A Lot :

Physical activity has been shown to boost mood, decrease the symptoms of depression, and reduce stress.3 Start slowly and build up to 30 to 60 minutes a day, five days a week, of aerobic exercise, strength training, yoga, or other fitness-related activities.

Getting outside daily, even for a few minutes a day, can make a huge impact on your mood and help target the specific symptoms of SAD related to a lack of daylight. 

  • Try To Split  Your Routine Work: 

It’s not uncommon to feel overwhelmed, lethargic, and unmotivated to exercise when feeling depressed. So, instead of committing to one longer workout, break the time up into chunks.

For example, if your goal is to walk 30 minutes a day, divide the time into three mini-workouts of 10 minutes each. Take one walk in the morning, another in the early afternoon, and one before it gets dark.

  • Try to Call on Your Friends or colleague: 

Loneliness and isolation tend to make the effects of the winter blues worse. That’s why you need your  support system, which may include friends, family, co-workers, and sponsors, should be on speed dial. If 2020,2021 and on going 2022 covid pandemic taught us anything, it is that human contact and socialization is important to our mental health.

If colder weather and shorter days cause you to feel the winter blues, you’re not alone. It’s not uncommon to experience fatigue, sadness, difficulty concentrating, and a disruption in your sleep schedule during the winter season.

It’s noticeable that some can manage to this mood change easily with lifestyle modifications. But for others, the winter blues can turn into a more severe type of depression. It’s called seasonal affective disorder or SAD. But the good news is that,  there are some things that can help  you  to overcome  the winter blues. 

Winter Blues vs. Seasonal Affective Disorder:

According to psychiatrists,  the main difference between the winter blues and SAD has to do with severity and function. It’s just like “sadness” vs. “depression.”

Winter Blues and its Symptoms: 

1.Sadness during the fall and winter months

2. Some trouble sleeping

3. Lack of motivation

4. Off mood 

5.  Frequent sleep and eating issues

6.  Depression that limits normal functioning and motivation

People feel sad sometimes, and there is nothing wrong with that. In fact, having emotions is part of what makes us all human and not something that we want to extinguish.

I have expressed previously that feeling sad or down sometimes, especially during the winter months, could be a sign of the winter blues. However, when sadness interferes with your ability to function in your daily life, it could be something more serious. So it’s time to get alert. 

For many people, the fall and winter months precipitate some gloom and sadness, and a lot of that is related to the lack of sunlight. 

It’s natural that during the winter months, people leave their home in the dark, spend all day in an office rooms with no windows, and then leave work to commute home again, in the dark. That can affect most people’s dispositions.  

 During this  pandemic, If you’re working from home, and not getting outdoors before work or during your lunch hour, you may not be leaving your home at all now that it turns dark earlier. So you have to face winter Blues. 

However, Winter Blues  is a more complex disorder that is not just sadness. People with this disorder  exhibit signs of a major depressive disorder, including difficulty with sleeping and eating. Even it  can come with noticeable fluctuations in energy levels and weight. 

You may also begin to isolate yourself and experience anhedonia. What it is? It is the inability to enjoy things that typically bring happiness. This can get severe enough where you may start to self-medicate with alcohol or drugs and even have ideas of self-harm or suicide. 

If the symptoms get this severe, it’s crucial to seek professional mental health services immediately. 

• Try the 10x10x10 Plan. ( Winter Blues: Why You Should Be Cautious about Winter Depression?)

It’s not uncommon to feel overwhelmed, lethargic, and unmotivated to exercise when feeling depressed. So, instead of committing to one longer workout, break the time up into chunks.

For example, if your goal is to walk 30 minutes a day, divide the time into three mini-workouts of 10 minutes each. Take one walk in the morning, another in the early afternoon, and one before it gets dark.

• Invite Your Support System:

Loneliness and isolation tend to make the effects of the winter blues worse. That’s why your support system, which may include friends, family, co-workers, and sponsors, should be on speed dial. If 2020, 2021 and 2022 taught us anything, it is that human contact and socialization is important to our mental health.

And when you are dealing with the winter blues, finding a way to spend time with supportive people is key to boosting your mood. This may include walks outdoors, talking on the phone, or coffee dates (virtual or in person, depending on your circumstances). 

• Seek Out the Sun :

Getting outside needs to be a priority during the winter months. Since lack of sun exposure worsened SAD symptoms. Soaking up the sun—even in winter temperatures—is critical.

Being in the sunlight helps balance serotonin activity, increases melatonin production, balances your circadian rhythm, and increases vitamin D levels, which can lead to an improved emotional state.

If you cannot get outdoors, move a chair, work station, or kitchen table next to a window that gets sunlight. Aim to sit in this location for at least one to two hours a day. If one sitting is not possible, break the time into shorter chunks throughout the daytime hours.

• Light Therapy 

If you’re not finding relief from some of the more low-level interventions, you may want to consider light therapy. This form of treatment is common for people diagnosed with SAD.

• Seek Professional Help

If lifestyle modifications and other low-level interventions do not provide enough relief from the winter blues, consider seeking professional help. Psychotherapy is highly recommended to treat depressive disorders and would likely benefit any individual suffering from SAD.

More specifically, the NIMH says cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has proven to be very effective in treating SAD.

• Consider Medication 

Your doctor or a mental health professional may recommend a medication for mood disorders if you are experiencing more than the winter blues. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are often used to treat SAD.

THE BOTTOM LINE :

The winter blues can take a toll on your physical and mental health. And while you can’t change the season, you can make choices to help minimize the effects of feeling down.

If lifestyle interventions like those listed above are not providing enough relief, it may be time to schedule an appointment with your doctor or mental health expert to determine if you’re dealing with the winter blues or SAD.Like many other mood disorders, you can take action to lessen the severity of the symptoms associated with  the winter blues.While you may not be able to change the weather or amount of daylight during

WINTER BLUES: WHY YOU SHOULD BE CAUTIOUS ABOUT WINTER DEPRESSION?

People feel sad sometimes, and there is nothing wrong with that. In fact, having emotions is part of what makes us all human and not something that we want to extinguish.

I have expressed previously that feeling sad or down sometimes, especially during the winter months, could be a sign of the winter blues. However, when sadness interferes with your ability to function in your daily life, it could be something more serious. So it’s time to get alert.

 For many people, the fall and winter months precipitate some gloom and sadness, and a lot of that is related to the lack of sunlight.

 It’s natural that during the winter months, people leave their home in the dark, spend all day in an office rooms with no windows, and then leave work to commute home again, in the dark. That can affect most people’s dispositions.  

 During this  pandemic, If you’re working from home, and not getting outdoors before work or during your lunch hour, you may not be leaving your home at all now that it turns dark earlier. So you have to face winter Blues. 

However, Winter Blues ( Why You Should Be Cautious about Winter Depression?) is a more complex disorder that is not just sadness. People with this disorder  exhibit signs of a major depressive disorder, including difficulty with sleeping and eating.

Even it  can come with noticeable fluctuations in energy levels and weight. You may also begin to isolate yourself and experience anhedonia, which is the inability to enjoy things that typically bring happiness. This can get severe enough where you may start to self-medicate with alcohol or drugs and even have ideas of self-harm or suicide.

 If the symptoms get this severe, it’s crucial to seek professional mental health services immediately.

 10 Tips to Help overcome the Winter Blues: 

 Boost Your Mood with Food: 

 Physical activity has been shown to boost mood, decrease the symptoms of depression, and reduce stress. Start slowly and build up to 30 to 60 minutes a day, five days a week, of aerobic exercise, strength training, yoga, or other fitness-related activities.

If 2020 taught us anything, it is that human contact and socialization is important to our mental health.

And when you are dealing with the winter blues, finding a way to spend time with supportive people is key to boosting your mood. This may include walks outdoors, talking on the phone, or coffee dates (virtual or in person, depending on your circumstances).

 Seek Out the Sun Getting outside needs to be a priority during the winter months. Since SAD symptoms are worsened by a lack of sun exposure, soaking up the sun—even in winter temperatures—is critical.Being in the sunlight helps balance serotonin activity, increases melatonin production, balances your circadian rhythm, and increases vitamin D levels, which can lead to an improved emotional state.

Seek Professional Help:

:

If lifestyle modifications and other low-level interventions do not provide enough relief from the winter blues, consider seeking professional help. Psychotherapy is highly recommended to treat depressive disorders and would likely benefit any individual suffering from SAD.

Winter Blues: Why You should be Cautious About the Winter Depression:

More specifically, the Doctors Of NIMHANCE says cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has proven to be very effective in treating SAD.Consider Medication.  Your doctor or a mental health professional may recommend a medication for mood disorders if you are experiencing more than the winter blues.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are often used to treat SAD. Some medical practitioners

has also approved the use of bupropion, another type of antidepressant, for treating SAD.

The winter blues can take a toll on your physical and mental health. And while you can’t change the season, you can make choices to help minimize the effects of feeling down.

THE BOTTOM LINE:

If lifestyle interventions like those listed above are not providing enough relief, it may be time to schedule an appointment with your doctor or mental health expert to determine if you’re dealing with the winter blues or SAD.