Tag Archives: Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore On Jesus Christ

Today 25th, December is a pious day for mankind. The Son of God, Jesus Christ was born in this day. We celebrate throughout the world Jesus birthday as Christmas day. Rabindranath Tagore observered this day in his Viswabharati at Shantiniketan, and still now the Viswabharati authority observes every year there. As a result, the teachers and students participate in the event with songs and music. So today, we shall discuss in this post on Rabindranath Tagore on Jesus Christ.

Tagore also influenced Western World with his spiritualistic philosophy and his divine poetic contents. Especially after being awarded the Nobel Prize for his collection of lyrics” Gitanjali”. We know Yeats wrote the introduction of this book. And its impact on western minds was enormous.

They took him as a Saint and seemed to be the light of consciousness during their contemporary crisis due to first World War. They thought Rabindranath as Jesus Christ.

On the other hand, Tagore was very much convinced about the Christian contribution to India in shaping a new thinking. This is quite evident from what Tagore wrote about Christianity. 

“As before, the genius of India has taken from her aggressors the most spiritually significant principle of their culture and fashioned a new message of hope for mankind.      

We have to reverse this thinking, imbibing the very Christian value of charity that cares only for the humans. Because they thought that humans are created in the image of God. This theology makes a huge difference.

But the man who led us to freedom, had truly imbibed this charity that came from the man who died on the cross, for his fellow brothers and sisters, and that is why Tagore says:

“And to our great good fortune, Gandhiji was able to receive this teaching of Christ in a living way.”

For Tagore, like Dr Stanley Jones, Gandhiji was indeed the Christ of the Indian road.

But Tagore says God is a loving Father from whom his only son emerged as the incarnation of love. It’s a love that leads to the cross to sacrifice oneself for fellow human beings.

Therefore, I have been told here before that Tagore was also sometimes compared in the West to Jesus in his manner and appearance. That the Birth of Jesus made a deep and lasting impression on Tagore is evident from his poem, The Child.

It is the only poem of Rabindranath Tagore, which is originally written in English. Tagore composed the poem in July 1930 after his visit to the village of Oberammergau, 40 miles from Munich, Germany.

Tagore visited the place to watch the traditional passion plays of Jesus Christ. It generally takes place in every ten years. However, Tagore wrote this poem ( the Child) having influenced by the passion plays of Jesus Christ. And ultimately, he later translated this poem into Bengali as Sishutirtha (Pilgrimage to Childhood) in Punashca.

The Child is a recurrent metaphor in Tagore’s poems. The passion coalesced  in the poet’s imagination and he conceived the Child in the harmony of creative impulse in the course of a night.    

However, Tagore finds humanity striving to transcend the burden of frustration and failure, breaking, yet refusing to be defeated and persevering with the quest.

Man contains in himself the spirit of his redemption and one day, the Newborn; the divine Child shall triumph towards glorious fulfilment. The poem is in ten sections and the actions pause and heaves like the eternal waves of the sea. In fact, the poem blends the cultural contexts of the East and West, of impressionistic description and profound prophecy.                      C:\Users\Fr.FelixRajSJ\Desktop\Jesus 1.jpgJesus ChristC:\Users\Fr.FelixRajSJ\Desktop\Tagore.jpg            C:\Users\Fr.FelixRajSJ\Desktop\Rabindranath Tagore - Young.jpgGurudev Rabindranath Tagore on Jesus Christ/image:http://kalpatarurudra.org/jpg

This impression on Tagore’s mind is further borne out by his translation of Eliot’s Ariel Poem, “Journey of the Magi” (Tirtho Jatri) in search of the Divine Infant.

Tagore had acknowledged the impact of Eliot’s poem. It’s because the obvious reason that the scene of the Nativity seems to have deeply moved him. Moreover, Ave Maria profoundly influenced and deeply inspired Tagore.

Tagore wrote another poem on Jesus Christ in 1939. He wrote these lines at the age of 78, during the period of his long illness and as death was drawing near. On Christmas day Tagore wrote a song to commemorate the birthday of Jesus Christ.  

 The poetry he wrote in these years is among the finest ones. It is distinctive of his preoccupation with death and transmigration. Probably he had contemplated on the sufferings and death of Jesus Christ. Naturally, Passion Plays he watched in Oberammergau, Germany influenced him very extensively.

The Second World War was declared on September 1, 1939. The Indian leaders had suggested that Britain should declare independence before India could help the Allied cause.   

 The request was naturally turned down. India was not free and Europe was at war. It was very sadistic to Tagore and his countrymen. Eventually, for Christmas service at Santiniketan Tagore wrote, “To Christ, the Son of Man”:   

         Bengali Song in Roman Script – Aekdin jara merechilo taré giyé  /Rajaro dohai diyé/

A yugé tarai janmo niyeche aji,/ Mandiré tara aesheche bhakto shaji-/ Ghatak shainyé daki‘/ Maro Maro’ othé hnaki./Garjoné mishé pujamantrer swar/-Manob-putro tibro baethaé kahen, Hé Iswar!/ A panpatro nidarun bishé bhara / Duré félé dao, duré félé dao twawra. 

   English Translation: One day those who killed him, In the name of the King, they have come back as devotees in the temples, Assailant calls the soldier kill him, Kill him’, yells, The yell mixes with prayer hymns – Says: he is in great pain, This cup is full of poison, Throw it away.

The Child (Sishutirtha)CHRISTMAS – THE BIRTH OF THE CHILD

 The Child is the only poem of Rabindranath Tagore, which is originally written in English. The piece was composed in July 1930 after he visited the village of Oberammergau, 40 miles from Munich, Germany. I have told it before.    

 Tagore visited the place to watch the traditional passion plays of Jesus Christ, held every ten years. That the Birth of Jesus made a deep and lasting impression on Tagore is evident from this poem. He later translated into Bengali as Sishutirtha (Pilgrimage to Childhood) in Punascha.

In fact, the Child is a recurrent metaphor in Tagore’s poems. The passion coalesced in the poet’s imagination and he conceived the Child in the harmony of creative impulse in the course of a night.    

 Tagore finds humanity striving to transcend the burden of frustration and failure, breaking, yet refusing to be defeated and persevering with the quest. Man contains in himself the spirit of his redemption and one day, the Newborn; the divine Child shall triumph towards glorious fulfillment.

The poem is in ten sections and the actions pause and heave like the eternal waves of the sea. The poem blends the cultural contexts of the East and West, of impressionistic description and profound prophecy.This impression on Tagore’s mind is further borne out by his translation of Eliot’s Ariel Poem, “Journey of the Magi” (Tirtho Jatri) in search of the Divine Infant.

  It is only hope and faith that take him along to the newness of life offered by the Child, full of divinity. We present the beautiful poem here for the readers to look around and see The Holy Child:The child

On both sides of the road the corn is ripe to the horizon, The glad golden answer of the earth to the morning light. The current of daily life moves slowly between the village near the hill and the one by the riverbank. The potter’s wheel goes round; the woodcutter brings fuel to the market, the cowherd takes his cattle to the pasture, and the woman with the pitcher on her head walking to the well.

    The First World War is going on. Reasonably, the Western people were longing for a calm and quiet atmosphere,  – a shelter where they could have spent a peaceful life. Hence, during this crucial time, they took shelter on Rabindranath Tagore.

On the other hand, Rabindranath believes that Western spirituality, especially the Christian faith and doctrine of love in humanity has a tremendous influence on the East. 

       Moreover, Tagore was very much convinced about the Christian contribution to India in shaping a new thinking. This is quite evident from what Tagore wrote about Christianity. 

“As before, the genius of India has taken from her aggressors the most spiritually significant principle of their culture and fashioned a new message of hope for mankind.

       There is in Christianity the great doctrine that God became man in order to save humanity by taking the burden of its sin and suffering on Himself, here in this very world, not waiting for the next. That the starving must be fed, the ragged clad, has been emphasised by Christianity as no other religion has done.”

This must serve as an eye-opener for many in India who denigrate Christianity and its significant contributions to this nation. But our most revered thinker and poet of Gitanjali, has spoken unequivocally that no religion emphasizes charity as much as Christianity, which has produced hundreds of charity icons throughout its history. 

          It is that charity which inspired people like Hume and C.F. Andrews to trigger the freedom  movement along with all other Indians. Then Tagore makes a pertinent observation regarding Christian charity and its Indian version:

“Charity, benevolence, and the like, no doubt have an important place in the religions of our country as well, but there they are in practice circumscribed within much narrower limits, and are only partially inspired by love of man. And to our great good fortune, Gandhiji was able to receive this teaching of Christ in a living way.”

This is a telling observation, because it comes from the poet who gave us our National Anthem, which in itself is an expression of this charity. 

              Moreover, as stated by Tagore, the charity practised in India was a circumscribed one and it was ‘only partially inspired by love of man’. But the Christian charity, the agape-love, is fully for human beings and with them. The words: ‘Love your neighbour as yourself’, tells it very vividly.

Tagore reminds India of its major flaw – a partial love of man. Are we not showing more concern to animals, rituals and customs than human beings? That is why even after 70 years of Independence, we are running after animals with an ambulance neglecting our own wounded brothers and sisters.

Therefore, we have to reverse this thinking, imbibing the very Christian value of charity that cares only for the humans, because humans are created in the image of God. This theology makes a huge difference.

But the man who led us to freedom, had truly imbibed this charity that came from the man who died on the cross, for his fellow brothers and sisters, and that is why Tagore says: “And to our great good fortune, Gandhiji was able to receive this teaching of Christ in a living way.”

For Tagore, like Dr. Stanley Jones, Gandhiji was indeed the Christ of the Indian road. For the visionary from Bengal, if India accepts this Christian charity, then all of us Indians can truly pray: 

       “Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high / Into that heaven of freedom, my Father, let my country awake!”

When Rabindranath Tagore addressed God as Father, he was asking India to change its age-old concept of God, which sees the divine only as power or ‘Shakti’. 

        But Tagore says God is a loving Father from whom his only son emerged as the incarnation of love, a love that leads to the cross to sacrifice oneself for fellow human beings. For Tagore, this Father makes all of us his children and therefore brothers and sisters.

If we have this sense of fellowship, then each and every citizen of our land can move around dauntlessly, with his head held high. This is the fruit of Christian charity and this is what Tagore wants every Indian to practice sincerely and honestly.

I have told before that Tagore was also sometimes compared in the West to Jesus in his manner and appearance

That the Birth of Jesus made a deep and lasting impression on Tagore is evident from his poem, The Child. It is the only poem of Rabindranath Tagore, which is originally written in English.

    Rabindranath composed the poem in July 1930 after he visited the village of Oberammergau, in Germany. It’s 40 miles away from Munich, Germany. Tagore visited the place to watch the traditional passion plays of Jesus Christ, held every ten years. Later he translated it into Bengali as Sishutirtha (Pilgrimage to Childhood) in Punashca.

However, The Child is a recurrent metaphor in Tagore’s poems. The passion coalesced  in the poet’s imagination and he conceived the Child in the harmony of creative impulse in the course of a night.

     Tagore finds humanity striving to transcend the burden of frustration and failure, breaking, yet they are refusing to be defeated and persevering with the quest. Man contains in himself the spirit of his redemption and one day, the Newborn; the divine Child shall triumph towards glorious fulfilmentp.

The poem is in ten sections and the actions pause and heave like the eternal waves of the sea. The poem blends the cultural contexts of the East and West, of impressionistic description and profound prophecy.

C:\Users\Fr.FelixRajSJ\Desktop\Jesus Christ.jpg
C:\Users\Fr.FelixRajSJ\Desktop\Jesus 1.jpg

Jesus Christ

C:\Users\Fr.FelixRajSJ\Desktop\Tagore.jpg
C:\Users\Fr.FelixRajSJ\Desktop\Rabindranath Tagore - Young.jpg
Rabindranath Tagore on Jesus Christ/image: kalpatarurudra.org/jpg

Rabindranath Tagore on Jesus Christ

This impression on Tagore’s mind is further borne out by his translation of Eliot’s Ariel Poem, “Journey of the Magi” (Tirtho Jatri) in search of the Divine Infant. Naturally, Tagore had acknowledged the impact of Eliot’s poem. It’s because the obvious reason that the scene of the Nativity seems to have deeply moved him. It influenced Tagore profoundly and deeply. Moreover, Ave Maria inspired him massively.

Tagore wrote another poem on Jesus Christ in 1939. He wrote these lines at the age of 78, during the period of his long illness and as death was drawing near.

    Truly, the poetry he wrote in these years is among the finest. And therefore, it is distinctive of his preoccupation with death and transmigration. Probably he had contemplated on the sufferings and death of Jesus Christ, naturally influenced by the Passion Plays he watched in Oberammergau, Germany.

The Second World War starts on September 1, 1939. The Indian leaders had suggested that Britain should declare independence before India could help the Allied cause. 

   The request was naturally turned down. So India was not free and Europe was at war. However, for Christmas service at Santiniketan Tagore wrote, “To Christ, the Son of Man”:             


Bengali Song in Roman Script
Aekdin jara merechilo taré giyé  Rajaro dohai diyéA yugé tarai janmo niyeche aji,Mandiré tara aesheche bhakto shaji-Ghatak shainyé daki‘Maro Maro’ othé hnaki.Garjoné mishé pujamantrer swar-Manob-putro tibro baethaé kahen, Hé Iswar!A panpatro nidarun bishé bharaDuré félé dao, duré félé dao twawra.   

English Translation
One day those who killed him, In the name of the KingThey have come back as devotees in the temples, Assailant calls the soldier‘Kill him, Kill him’, yells, The yell mixes with prayer hymnsSays he is in great pain, This cup is full of poison, Throw it away.

Rabindranath Tagore on Jesus Christ /image: kalpatarurudra.org/jpg

The Child (Sishutirtha)

CHRISTMAS – THE BIRTH OF THE CHILD

The people celebrate The birth of Jesus Christ all over the world on December 25. On Christmas Day, the Viswabharati of Tagore also organises the Christo Utsab at Shantiniketan.] 

The Child is the only poem of Rabindranath Tagore, which is originally written in English. He composed this piece of poem in July 1930 after his visit to the village of Oberammergau, 40 miles from Munich, Germany. I have told it before. 

    However, Tagore visited the place to watch the traditional passion plays of Jesus Christ. It takes place there in every ten years. That the Birth of Jesus made a deep and lasting impression on Tagore is evident from this poem. Eventually, the poet later translated it into Bengali as Sishutirtha (Pilgrimage to Childhood) in Punascha.

So The Child is a recurrent metaphor in Tagore’s poems. The passion coalesced in the poet’s imagination and he conceived the Child in the harmony of creative impulse in the course of a night. ( Rabindranath Tagore on Jesus Christ)

    Tagore finds humanity striving to transcend the burden of frustration and failure, breaking, yet refusing to be defeated and persevering with the quest. Man contains in himself the spirit of his redemption and one day, the Newborn; the divine Child shall triumph towards glorious fulfilment.

Rabindranath Tagore on Jesus Christ

The poem is in ten sections and the actions pause and heave like the eternal waves of the sea. The poem blends the cultural contexts of the East and West. It is full of impressionistic description and profound prophecy.

Eliot’s Ariel Poem, “Journey of the Magi” ( Tirtho Jatri ) impressed on Tagore’s mind profoundly. Naturally, he translated Eliot’s Ariel Poem, “Journey of the Magi” (Tirtho Jatri) in search of the Divine Infant.

However, Tagore had acknowledged the impact of Eliot’s poem. It’s because the obvious reason that the scene of the Nativity seems to have deeply moved him. Moreover, Ave Maria profoundly influenced and deeply inspired him . 

Here the Saint-  poet depicts a flowing, rhythmic spiritual journey of man. How human beings through the ages from the bondage of ignorance to the freedom of enlightenment and self-improvement human beings are journeying .

    Therefore,  It is only hope and faith that take him along to the newness of life offered by the Child, full of divinity. We present the beautiful poem here for the readers to look around and see The Holy Child:

The child ( Rabindranath Tagore on Jesus Christ)

The first flush of dawn glistens on the dew-dripping leaves of the forest. 

The man who reads the sky cries: 

“Friends, we have come!” 

They stop and look around. 

On both sides of the road the corn is rip,e to the horizon, 

The glad golden answer of the earth to the morning light. 

The current of daily life moves slowly 

between the village near the hill and the one by the riverbank. 

The potter’s wheel goes round; the woodcutter brings fuel to the market, 

the cowherd takes his cattle to the pasture, 

and the woman with the pitcher on her head walk to the wellwalkingut where is the King’s castle, the mine of gold, 

the secret book of magic, 

the sage who knows love’s utter wisdom? 

“The stars cannot be wrong,” assures the reader of the sky. 

“Their signal points to that spot.” 

And reverently he walks to a wayside spring 

from which wells up a stream of water, a liquid light, like the morning melting 

into a chorus of tears and laughter 

Near it in a palm grove surrounded by a strange hush stands a leaf-thatched hut 

at whose portal sits the poet of the unknown shore, and sings: 

“Mother, open the gate!” 

A ray of morning sun strikes aslant at the door. 

The assembled crowd feels in their blood the primaeval chant primaeval: 

“Mother, open the gate!” 

The gate opens.

The mother is seated on a straw bed with the babe on her lap, 

Like the dawn with the morning star. 

The sun’s ray that was waiting at the door outside falls on the head of the child. 

The poet strikes his lute and sings out: 

“Victory to Man, the new-born, the newborn!” 

They kdown, — ing and the beggar, the saint and the sinner, 

the wise and the fool, — and cry: 

“Victory to Man, the New-Born, the Ever-Living!” 

The old man from the East murmurs to himself: 

“I have seen!” 

    Rabindranath Tagore 

Read more: JESUS CHRIST IN THE DREAM OF SWAMI VIVEKANANDA

RABIBDRANATH TAGORE IN DEPRESSION

Rabindranath Tagore in Depression

From Gitànjàli

The entire Sky is covered with Sun and Stars / The Universe is full of Souls . / Amongst it I have sung my song . For this , astonishingly my heart has been awakened.’. —- (Rabindranath Tagore in depression)

“Learning Never Exhausts Mind ” –  Leonardo da Vinci

Nobel Laureate Indian Poet and writer, Rabindranath Tagore was a great personality and statesman of India as well as in the World. He had enjoyed a lot of fame.

But We can not imagine that he has suffered from depression. So, today’s article is “Rabindranath Tagore in depression”.


He travelled almost all the important places of this country and aboard, Sometimes more than one time. His childhood days were spent in captivity with the firm vigilance of the servants.


But he had to practice wrestling every day in the home. A wrestler was appointed to teach them and he practised it with his co- wrestler.


His physique was bold and steady. Even he was a good looking man. What we see in the picture, is his old age photo.


Despite that, he was very alone in his personal life. Therefore, Sometimes Rabindranath Tagore was in depression.



HIS DAILY ROUTINE:


Writing works is not easily done. It is to be done for a long time.


Rabindranath was an early riser. He used to go morning walk. Then he bathed in cold water, even in winter. Being refreshed he used to start his writing until lunchtime.



After getting lunch, he took a rest a bit. Then again he starts writing.

Sometimes, people, friends, students came to visit him in the evening. Music, the drama was his most favourite.


Occasionally, he, along with his family members and relatives, friends, even students used to engage in rehearsal of any drama . perhaps it might have his new drama, like Shyama, Chitrangada, Bisarjan etc.



Besides, when he got the responsibility to look after their Zamindari of East Bengal (now Bangladesh), he had to go there. So, a lot of duties he did.


But this celebrated poet led a lonely life and suffered from frequent bouts of depression – he confessed in a letter to his son, Rathindra Nath Tagore by his father R. N. Tagore.




In a new biography, eminent Historian, Sabyasachi Bhattacharjee says one of his worst spells of depression came in 1914, a year after he won Noble Prize in literature.


Multi-talented Tagore:


It is known to all that Tagore was a multi-talented writer. He died in 1941 for infection in the Kidney after a major operation by Dr Bidhan Chandra Roy, the erstwhile Chief Minister of Bengal.


Throughout his life, Rabindranath enriched Bengali literature. He wrote in all spheres of literature and also other faculties of fine arts.

He composed four thousand poems, above two thousand songs, 100 and above short stories, dramas, novels, essays, more than two thousand paintings and so on.



TRAGIC INCIDENT IN TAGORE’S LIFE:



Tragically, he lost his daughters, son, wife and father when he was only 45 to 50 years old.


So it is very unfortunate for him to be detached from the dearest and nearest all these family members.


Naturally, he became isolated due to the tremendous loss of his son and daughters.

As a result, he was not in a good state of mind for some time. Though he overcame these clouds and started his regular works.

According to the biography, he suffered from bouts of depression at that time. In January 1915 Tagore again speaks of a breakdown, deep depression.

But in February he claimed to have been healed in the solitude of the boat he inhabited on the banks of Padma river in Shilaidaha in Bangladesh.

– says historian Sabyasachi Bhattacharji in his book ” Rabindranath Tagore: An Interpretation “.

Rabindranath Tagore also wrote in his biography “Jibansmriti ” and “Chelebela ” that he struggled with loneliness from childhood.

” I was very lonely – that was the special feature of my childhood – I was very lonely. I saw my father seldom : he was away a great deal . I was kept in charge of the servants of the home after my mother died ,”

— Tagore wrote to a confidant.

Biographer quotes Tagore as having written to a friend that he would sometimes ” pass many months absolutely alone without speaking , till my voice grew thin and weak through lack of use .”

The poet’s loneliness was due to ” disappointment with the support he received from his people , especially the Bengali people. A sense of loneliness in has life as an institution – builder in a society , and a mindset that was hostile , or at best apathetic.

His memorable song ‘ Ekla Chalo Re ‘ ( If They Answer Not To Thy Call , Walk Alone’ ) was written in 1905 , when he has been distracted in depression.

Hope you have realized about the mental state of Rabindranath Tagore in depression.

       Read more:Rabindranath as a Singer, Musician & Lyricist